About your Search

20121027
20121104
STATION
CSPAN2 9
CSPAN 5
KQED (PBS) 3
KPIX (CBS) 2
KQEH (PBS) 2
CNN 1
CNNW 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
LINKTV 1
WETA 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 35
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
and religion in general, as is our way in this class, but we think about identity and relationship. well, what if we talked about identity and self-esteem and relationship as empowerment? that's what i think we're seeing when we're talking about the african-american muslim movement. in other words, identity is self-esteem- a person must feel good about themselves- and relationship is about empowerment. and i'm- you know, this is not the gospel truth here, as always- i'm working with some ideas that we're familiar with, so we can try to make sense of this powerful doctrinal statement. so when we look at the nation of islam, as we have here on the graphic, we can see it as a reinterpreretation of traditionl islamic or muslim doctrine, in order to meet ethical challenges in a society that is perceived to be racist by african-americans. see where i'm headed with this? that we take traditional muslim doctrines and we reinterpret it in order to raise up self-esteem- that is, identity- and raise up relationship, which is empowerment, and this may be the key behind it. well, of course, i'll ask our ex
out there are typically democratic blue-collar working-class men and women, roman catholic in religion -- certainly not all of them, and pro-union. these were the quintessential reagan democrats. they were in counties adjacent to pittsburgh like beaver and westmorland and washington and corrine and further to the east -- kim-shree and fayette. those counties have a propensity to vote republican, particularly in the elections. they are culturally conservative, pro-gun, pro-life, not particularly fond of gay- rights. then think of pennsylvania, draw a big t up the center of the state, fanned out across the new york border, not quite getting to erie or the northeastern part of the state, the big t -- that is the conservative area of the state. basically white, protestant, does not have a definable ethnic group in particular. once you get east of the susquehanna river, with the exception of a few counties, the demography changed sharply. let's get down to southeast -- philadelphia, heavily democratic -- democratic, but the suburban counties, and montgomery, chester, delaware, the swing tow
religions that are completely welcoming of marriages. episs copal church is a very good example. so what we're talking about here is really the granting of a marriage license by a civil institution. going down to city hall and getting your civil marriage license. while i completely understand and honor the caller's concept of not wanting to judge and wanting to treat all equally, at the end of the day the only way that we achieve that is by offering all americans equal protection under the law. and really only a civil marriage license when it comes to the recognition of our families provides that. so it is important to hold on to the concept of wanting to protect all americans. and i would continue to engage with the caller and really kind of all thoughtful fair-minded people that are on this journey. but what i would offer is that if we really are true to the concept of equality in this country and really wanting to treat all americans equally, and there's a thoughtful conversation of the issues at play and we don't want second class institutions for some and kind of different treatment, i
over." >> khan: yeah, yeah, and he's absolutely right. i think it's not religion itself. i mean, it's the baggage that comes with it, frankly, that's in the name of religion, people are doing horrible things. >> pitts: and in the pakistan of your youth, you could... whatever your faith was was acceptable. >> khan: absolutely, and not only was it acceptable, it was respected. >> pitts: the man who grew up on cricket in pakistan says his passion for american football began at the university of illinois, cheering on the fighting illini. with financial success came the opportunity to buy into the game at the highest level. khan says he leaves the football side of the business to others, but expects the best from his players. so one of his first moves was to provide them with what's said to be the best locker room in the nfl. >> khan: this is about comfort. this is about recognition. this is about setting standards. >> pitts: and in a strategy he hopes will pay dividends for the team and jacksonville, he announced plans for the jaguars to play one home game in london for the next four se
to it. i think that relation, not just the catholic church, but faith and religion are misrepresented in the major media. first of all, you can present your own opinion on fact, as fact, because why? as long as you're talking about religion, religion is totally subjective and the not based on any truth, no matter what you say, it's okay. what's an example of that? this last week, bill collar of the new york times wrote an article how to die, it was all about end of life care. the suggestions he made was that the reason we're not able to, as a society, get to a point in which our loved ones can die peacefully is because the catholic church would never allow such practices to occur. meaning what? a suggestion that the catholic church would require a family member to go to extreme means to keep somebody who is dying alive. it's simply not the truth. but, nobody stands up to it because you know what? as long as you're talking about religion, as long as you can offer any opinion you want and pass it as fact because religion itself is purely subjective. >> clayton: what about during the vic
that dna can be ascertained through nature and that one does not need established religion. he was very much an antiestablishment type of person, both in his politics and his religion. this is a very rare volume, i'm not sure how many there are,. >> supposedly there were 34. and what happened was he published it and it was in the warehouse. and the warehouse was struck by lightning and burned. and of course, everyone said, okay, that was because god was smiting him for this kind of thing. i'm not sure how many are in other libraries. it is a very rare book to get in this particular edition. >> this book we have conserved. it is in very good condition and we did not touch the marks of the previous owner. probably the name of the previous owner. he put it in a very modest binding. it would have been a very modest book when it was first published. >> is an iconic figure. we tend to think of ethan allen and the green mountain boys and their struggles really from new york, but were just talking about how we tend to forget there were a lot of other people working with us, but he has become th
but it's not all about religion. but it's about the complicated layers which makes up the region. the question about iraq, can it or will it regain? is already there. part of the problem in terms of what the government in baghdad is trying to do, it doesn't matter if it's malik your anybody else. he believes in a strong central government. certainly stronger than the constitution which is very weak. and was written by shia and kurds who said never again to a strong central government. but you have a government that functions that can protect the country inhabit as weak as it is and not be able to defend its borders and to project national power. so there are people, and the indy i surveyed that was a pulitzer but that was published in april or may says that maliki, love him or him from a certain more popular than he was six months ago. and his popular including among the sunnis and others who see him, not the election, they, they don't have to like them, it's not a popular to contest. i think the iraqis know that. but they don't know who else is there, and he has taken strong mov
him. >> bill: religion crew. >> disparagement. joe the plumber doesn't. he doesn't have a pickup truck. there seems to be a real dissociation between him and the hoypaloy. >> bill: do you think it has to do with grievance. in some african-americans african-american communities there are grievants to whites that aren't pathetic to their cause. that might be driving a little bit of it. there are some african-americans who believe that the reason they are not prospering as a community, all right. is because society hasn't done enough and the reason it hasn't done enough is because of rich white guys? >> no. i don't think of it like that with obama. i think of him as one was those swells who looks down at people aren't up to speed intellectually with him. i don't get a color thing off of him. i know that crowd: they sit around and they, you know, they have jack henry abbot and norman there. >> and canopies? >> and all that stuff. >> bill: you have ever had a canopy at your house? i don't even know what a canopy is. >> the thing you put over the picnic table when you have burgers. you put
to be built in their state. host: she brought up religion, so let's talk about the role of churches, parishes, synagogues can play in the campaign and whether they are allowed to contribute. guest: they're not contributing directly to the campaigns, just like a corporation could not contribute. so we're not seeing money come directly from religious organizations. but certainly people's beliefs, people's attitudes toward important political issues are sometimes if shaped by their religious beliefs. and they have been important to populations -- they have been important population, people you can rely on in the election, since they are older and have certain religious beliefs. but they cannot play a financial goal. host: john is a democrat. caller: i just wanted to say that bush, romney, and the republicans have set up this tax structure which helps these companies take our jobs overseas for cheaper labor. and the internet will also suck up a lot of jobs in the coming future. you can have a job almost anywhere, so all the tax money but being received, i believe, is going to go to corporations w
whether they get to eat. religion is banned. there is no rule of law, and perceived political infractions are met with harsh punishment, punishment, i should add, that is often needed out to the three generations of a person's family , and political offenders knows that when he goes to present his parents and his children will probably go with him. there are probably about 200,000 north koreans today in the gulag, and more than a million, perhaps as high as 2 million have already died there. the reason we know all of this and much, much more is thanks to the testimonies of north koreans to have escaped. these are the people i write about in my book. this knowledge comes to us despite the best efforts of the family regime to keep it secret. for more than 50 years, ever since the end of the korean war, north korea has been sealed off from the world's eyes. the family regime has pursued an isolationist policy and it maintains an iron grip on information, access to which is very strictly controlled. to give just one example, every radio must be registered with the government, and its style mu
is a representation of the holy trinity and that walk through that triangle is blasphemous. religion appears to be the root as well for the belief that the number 13 is is unlucky. 13, after all, was the number of people who shared the last supper on the eve of christ's trial and crucifixion. the fear of black cats goes back to the middle ages when folks associated them with witches and even believed that they were witches in disguise. the idea that breaking a mirror brings seven years of bad luck is a reflection, if you will, of an old belief that our souls dwell in mirrors. and that to break a mirror damages our souls. but on the flip side, horse shoes are considered lucky. because their shape resembles a crescent moon considered a sign of fertility by the ancients. just ahead, what the fates say. >> on rare occasion you'll get the bad guys. it's totally possible that they could come through a ouija board. with the fidelity stock screener, you can try strategies from independent experts and see what criteria they use. such as a 5% yield on dividend-paying stocks. then you can customize the
really looking at it as a common religion. they are quite far along. syria and iran share americanism and the anti-israeli attitude. they share a common front. the shia crescent is there. and the growing [inaudible] the crescent goes from libya through egypt through georgia and the western part of iran and saudi arabia and the coast. moving across saudi arabia. increasingly the joint of sectarian war. the optimism in syria is increasingly being joined by these extremists. it is one of the reasons for supporting bad, saudi arabia is providing small arms. and we have to ask ourselves, what kind of extremism is coming out of that? >> we also have a situation of that which is maintained by russia. again, that group -- it goes back again. all relationships between russia and syria. they are both against the security council and it has to do with a great power in war over there. there is the issue of what issue is that that they are actually supporting? i have a syrian contact that i talked to a couple of days and he said syria? we think of ourselves as [inaudible] , but we do not know what
going to bordeaux and saying to people, "i've got a great new religion for you and, by the way, give up your wine." >> narrator: the task: to put on a suit and tie, and climb on your bicycle. >> the tried and true and well-worn method was knocking on doors. and so we knocked on thousands and thousands and thousands of doors. >> the mormon mission does teach you to deal with rejection. most people are not thrilled to see a pair of mormon missionaries on their door. >> narrator: rejection was at the heart of the experience. >> and it means cultivating your own inner spiritual life. where else are you going to get the resources and the strength to carry on this difficult work of knocking on people's doors and pleading with them to listen to you unless you feel like god is with you? >> narrator: and during that time, mitt was worried about the news from home. his father was running for president. >> we would get a hold of the herald tribuand kind of keep up on what was happening. >> narrator: the news was not good. george's campaign was in trouble. he had changed his position on the vietnam
to the vice- presidential candidates. as a catholic, how has your view on abortion been shaped by religion? >> i am not catholic. i am episcopalian. my husband is catholic. my children are catholic. my grandchildren have been baptized in the catholic church. but i would be happy to talk about my view on abortion. my view is that it can be safe, legal, and rare. >> a valid point, it is a difference between us that is not manufactured. we have babies in america and and i love being aborted simply because they are little baby girls. the mother once a boy instead of a girl. it is coming from the asian community as well. with legislation that prohibits sex-selective abortion, she thinks is ridiculous to talk about and i think it matters to the little girls that are being aborted. >> find key senate races across the country on c-span, c-span radio, and c-span.org/ campaign2012. >> in 30 minutes, a discussion on the future of the news industry, including investigative reporting and collaborative journalism. hurricane sandy is to blame for at least 48 deaths. more than 8 million people without pow
big a role does your catholic religion play in your vote? >> i think it is big, i'm an ex-nun. and i -- the group of nuns that i associate with this day push for obama. >> reporter: is the pro-choice stand difficult for you to reconcile? >> it was difficult, it bothered me a long, long time. >> reporter: as did the same-sex marriage issue, that she ultimately looked past, but for others, some issues are non-negotiatable. >> i am pro life and wanted an administration that supports that view. and i would say the sanctity of life and marriage. >> poppy harlow, joining us, you have been all over the state, barack obama won in 2008 in that state. polls show he is ahead. but could mitt romney really make a run in these final three days? because it looks like the majority of people you spoke to in that piece are big advocates, big supporters of romney. >> reporter: well that is when you talk about mitt romney, they overwhelmingly backed santorum, but it seems that they moved into that romney camp, largely because they will oppose obama strongly on the same-sex marriage, and funding for cont
recounts his life in fractalist. in of africa, africa's culture, religion, history and identity. look for these titles in bookstores this coming we can watch for the authors in the near future on booktv and on booktv.org. >> could have wanted more but in the conference can only do so much so want diversity. you want democrats, republicans, different parts of the country. everyone at different ages. we knew on the basis of nine, you can't make generalizations that are 100% certain. we may say as much in the book because conclusions are hypothesis that other people might run with but in order to make those hypotheses we needed a fairly diverse group. >> we also have the white house project for the last couple election cycles and several of the women identified several years before the 2008 election, kathleen sibelius, both in there, and barbara lee has been here several years from now when you did the last round with her foundation and talked about looking at women governors. we wanted to look at women governors who had been through barbara lee's training through the pipeline. we also m
about religion. if you have been going to church or synagogue or mosque or one year or 10 years or 25 years or 50 years waiting to know enough about god so you can swing into action i'm telling you that you already know enough. and you know deep in your heart that you know enough. you know what to do. jesus reminds us with every story, every parable, every teaching come every commandment we are to bring good news to the poor. we are to bring relief to the captors and let the oppressed go free and proclaim the year of the lord's favor. we are to feed the hungry and clothe the naked and we are to visit the sick and those in prison. i wonder, don't you? i wonder how many people in our great country are drowning in loneliness, hurtheard, sin doubt and despair or are unemployed and do not have health care or quality education while we who know what to do don't respond. [applause] [applause] just like jesus hometown synagogue and nazareth, every one of us every one of us of every faith tradition stands judged by our
or any religious leaders say this. you already know all you need to know about religion. if you have been going to church or synagogue or a mosque for one year or 10 years or 25 years waiting to know enough about god so you can swing into action, i am telling you you already know enough. you know deep in your heart that you know enough. you know what to do. jesus reminds us with every story, every parable, every teaching, at the commandment, we are to bring good news to the poor. we are to let the oppressed go free and proclaim the lord's favor. i wonder how many people are drowning in loudly next, hertz, sand, doubt and despair. -- hurt, doubt, and despair. how many do not have hurt, loneliness, doubt, and despair. how many know this and do not respond? [applause] just like jesus' hometown synagogue in nazareth, everyone of us of every faith tradition stands just by our own familiar stories of faith and transformation. what we already know of god's reconciling message. democrats, you already know what to do. republicans, you already know what to do. followers of christ, you already know
meaning. whether that meeting as defined in terms of religion or in terms in which life can take on significance. but to take on significance, life must be spent doing important things, things which you can take the dissatisfaction as you reach my age. my proposition and i will be interested in the audience wants to add another domain. it basically comes from the four domains, and those are location, family, community and faith. i will say that to the vocation will include avocations and causes in that definition. but basically they are all they are. there's other ways of having pleasure in life but those are the things that give us deep satisfaction. the reason they give us deep satisfaction is because if we are lucky we would spend our life doing something which we can legitimately say to ourselves and major difference and something which was important to do. finally a vacation that you love is important. a member of the community in which you are engaged in the lives of people around you and a good neighbor and more important than having backyard barbecues to read charge again
that i thought was guaranteed under the constitution, the practice of your religion, that now there has to be an amendment put forward to bring that about. if the law was never passed, the lawsuit wouldn't be in place, and religious freedom, today, would not be in question. >> moderator: continuing with rebuttals, mr. horning, 30 seconds. horning: there's a lot of misunderstanding, and there's no real winning the issue. unfortunately, it's one of those that, you know, it's an outcome of something terrible happening sometimes, and it's dealing with life situation nobody wants. we can't do justice to it. as a federal legislature, i can't do justice to it. i would fail in what i would try to achieve. >> moderator: thank you. mr. donnelly? donnelly: my faith guided me on the issue, and i know their faiths have guided my friends who are up here as well. we have a program in my town called the women's care center. what they do is provide a positiontive alternative. for women who are pregnant, there's an opportunity for a place to live, a place to be cared for, and for somebody to know there's
state. people aren't slaves of the kim family regime. they control even if they get to eat. religion, and no rule of law , percy political infractions are met with harsh 10-- punishment meted out three generations of political fender knows when he goes to present his parents and his children will pare -- probably go with him. there are 200,000 north koreans today in the gulag may be as high as 2 million have already died. the reason reno this and much more is the testimony of those who have escaped for the these are the people i write about in my book this comes despite the regime broke to keep it secret. north korea has been not from the world's eyes. the regime has pursued the isolationist policy and has an iron grip want access on which is strictly controlled. to give one example every radio must be registered and the dial must be fixed to the government-run radio station. security police equipped with scanners tried to identify households where residents have tinkered with the radio and tuning in to foreign broadcast. surveys of north koreans hiding in china show a high percentag
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)